Tag: Psy.D.

Get moving with the whole family

Most health care providers agree that staying physically active is a good thing for people who are living with chronic pain.   While people may think “if it hurts, rest it,” many pain specialists advise that people with chronic pain participate in some form of regular physical activity.  This is because when the parts of the… Read more »

The facts about weight loss myths

For many people, losing weight helps them manage their chronic pain.  Losing weight can help ease the burden on muscles and bones, and can be especially helpful for people with back pain or pain from osteoarthritis.  Unfortunately, there are many weight-loss myths that can make it hard to try to lose weight.  Here are some… Read more »

Gender, pain, and intimacy

We all know the typical “I will fix it” response that many men are prone to take when their female partners talk about being in pain. Adopting a “fix it” approach does make some sense. None of us wants to see our partners suffer, and it is right in line with time-honored theories about pain behavior–… Read more »

Using chronic pain as an opportunity for personal growth

Chronic pain is not something you have to experience passively.  Part of taking an active role in coping with your pain is finding a way to use it to learn more about yourself. How do you begin to make sense of what it means to live in pain?   For many people, living with chronic pain… Read more »

Making the most of your medical visits

It’s easy to become distracted, nervous, and unable to concentrate or think as clearly as usual during a medical appointment – especially one for a pain problem. Health care providers typically have busy schedules and may often be pressed for time. If you feel pressure during the appointment it may be difficult to stay focused… Read more »